Post # 2 Is Sugar Really That Bad?

Tommy and LaDonna CecilUncategorized

Post # 2    Is Sugar Really That Bad ?

 

When it comes to the consumption of sugar, and its affect on the body, a little bit won’t hurt. Everyone says its fuel for the brain. The question is: should it be consumed and if so, in what amounts?

 

Is-Sugar-Really-That-Bad-For-You-1

 

Sugar is not a food group and by itself contains:

  • no nutrients
  • no protein
  • no healthy fats
  • no enzymes

 

Just empty and quickly digested calories that actually pull minerals from the body during digestion.

Is There Any Safe Amount of Sugar?

In my opinion, there is no safe amount of processed or refined sugar. Naturally contained sugars in fruit and vegetables are balanced by the fiber, vitamins, enzymes and other properties of the fruit/vegetable which slow sugar digestion and help the body deal with it more easily. Processed varieties, on the other hand, provide none of these benefits and instead create these harmful effects of sugar in the body:

  • Stresses the Liver: “When we eat fructose, it goes to the liver. If liver glycogen is low, such as after a run, the fructose will be used to replenish it (3).However, most people aren’t consuming fructose after a long workout and their livers are already full of glycogen. When this happens, the liver turns the fructose into fat (2). Some of the fat gets shipped out, but part of it remains in the liver. The fat can build up over time and ultimately lead to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (456).”
  • Increases Bad Cholesterol and Triglycerides (source)
  • Can contribute to Leptin Resistance (and then weight gain, cravings, sleep trouble, etc) – source
  • Creates an addictive sugar response in the brain (source)
  • Doesn’t fill you up and instead encourages you to eat more

 

What’s in Sugar?

Most often, when we talk about sugar, we are referring to a mixture of glucose and fructose, both simple sugars that are “Dextrose, fructose, and glucose are all monosaccharides, known as simple sugars. The primary difference between them is how your body metabolizes them. Glucose and dextrose are essentially the same sugar. However, food manufacturers usually use the term “dextrose” in their ingredient list. contained in various amounts in different foods as this article explains:

  • The simple sugars can combine to form more complex sugars, like the disaccharidesucrose (table sugar), which is half glucose and half fructose.
  • High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose.
  • Ethanol (drinking alcohol) is not a sugar, although beer and wine contain residual sugars and starches, in addition to alcohol.
  • Sugar alcohols like xylitol, glycerol, sorbitol, maltitol, mannitol, and erythritol are neither sugars nor alcohols but are becoming increasingly popular as sweeteners. They are incompletely absorbed from your small intestine, for the most part, so they provide fewer calories than sugar but often cause problems with bloating, diarrhea, and flatulence.
  • Sucralose (Splenda) is NOT a sugar, despite its sugar-like name and deceptive marketing slogan, “made from sugar.” It’s a chlorinated artificial sweetener in line with aspartame and saccharin, with detrimental health effects to match.
  • Agave syrup, falsely advertised as “natural,” is typically HIGHLY processed and is usually 80 percent fructose.The end product does not even remotely resemble the original agave plant.
  • Honey is about 53 percent fructose2, but is completely natural in its raw form and has many health benefits when used in moderation, including as many antioxidants as spinach.
  • Stevia is a highly sweet herb derived from the leaf of the South American stevia plant, which is completely safe (in its natural form). Lo han (or luohanguo) is another natural sweetener, but derived from a fruit.”

So, what is the right amount of sugar to take in? I will let you be the judge of this yourself.

Post #3 What happens when you drink soda?